Polling Update: Heated Immigration Debates, Public Opinion Still Supports Immigrants

Summary of Public Opinion Polling on Immigration for Winter 2017/2018

The closing of 2017 and the beginning of 2018 saw intense battles over the issue of immigration. Congress and the president wrangled over the fate of Dreamers, undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. The president sought funding for a border wall and insisted that legal immigration be cut. Many in the Trump Administration and Congress portrayed family and other immigration in an exceedingly negative way.

Yet, during this same period, the public remained supportive of immigration. Not only is there overwhelming support for Dreamers, but most of the public thinks that other undocumented immigrants should be given a chance to stay in the U.S. legally, under certain conditions. Public opinion polling shows little appetite for cutting legal immigration and skepticism toward proposals to make it harder to bring close family members to the United States.

While there is significant consensus, attitudes are not uniform on all of these questions and some questions generate different responses that break down along partisan lines.

This summary is divided into four topics:

  1. Immigration and Diversity
  2. Legal Immigration System
  3. Undocumented Immigrants
  4. DACA recipients and Dreamers

1. General Views on Immigration and Diversity

At the beginning of 2018, public opinion polls are finding that Americans have a far more positive view of immigrants than the acrimonious political debate in Washington would suggest. Tim Malloy, assistant Director of Quinnipiac University Poll, summarizes their polling: “Where you come from is irrelevant, says a welcoming nation that sees immigrants as assets, not liabilities, for a country built on people looking for a better life.”

The Quinnipiac University poll released on January 18 asked registered voters whether they thought legal immigration was good or bad for the country, 89 percent of voters said they thought legal immigration was good. On this topic, there was little difference across partisan or demographic lines — 91 percent of Democrats said they thought immigration was good for the country, compared to 90 percent of independents and 87 percent of Republicans.[1]

The same poll asked more specifically if voters thought immigration from “diverse countries” makes the U.S. better or worse. More than three-quarters of voters overall (78 percent) said better, and voters across party lines were positive about this diversity. Nearly nine-in-ten Democrats said they thought immigration from diverse countries made the country better, followed by independents (80 percent) and Republicans (62 percent). Among age cohorts, the youngest (18-34-year-olds) were the most positive (91 percent), with progressively older voters less positive, but even with voters 65 and older, more than two-thirds (67 percent) thought diversity made the country better.[2]

Another question sought voter opinions on whether they thought immigrants from certain countries deserved to come to the U.S. more than those from other countries. Overall, and across party lines, voters said it shouldn’t matter what country an immigrant comes from (76 percent overall; 89 percent of Democrats; 76 percent of independents, 57 percent of Republicans).[3]

The mid-January NBC News-Survey Monkey poll asked respondents if they thought immigration helped the U.S. more than it hurts the country. More than half, 58 percent, said that immigration helps the country more than it hurts. Just 39 percent felt the opposite.[4]

In another mid-January poll, conducted by the Washington Post and ABC News65 percent of respondents said they thought that immigrants mainly strengthen American society. Nearly half (46 percent) said they felt that way “strongly.” However, there was a significant partisan divide, with 80 percent of Democrats and 43 percent of Republicans saying they thought immigrants strengthen America. Younger cohorts (18 to 39) were much more likely to have a favorable view of immigrants (74 percent think immigrants strengthen America, with more than half feeling so strongly) while less than half of respondents aged 65 and over believed immigrants strengthen America.[5]

Quinnipiac University poll released February 6 found satisfaction with the current level of legal immigration to the United States. Overall, 54 percent of respondents said that immigration should be kept at about the same level, 24 percent said immigration should be increased, and only 17 percent said it should be decreased. Republicans and Democrats varied little in their expressed satisfaction with current levels of immigration (53 percent and 56 percent, respectively). The only group that fell below 50 percent in believing that immigration should be kept at current levels was the 18- to 34-year-olds — 37 percent of whom said they thought immigration should be increased.[6]

2. Reform of the Legal Immigration System

During this period, the president and some legislators sought changes to the legal immigration system that would cut legal immigration significantly, specifically to cut back on family-based immigration and eliminate the diversity visa lottery. These ideas have been tied to the president’s support for a deal for the Dreamers. While there is some receptivity to the idea of putting greater emphasis on immigrants with education and skills, the public rejects the idea that immigrants should be treated differently depending on their class, race, or religion.

CBS News poll released January 20 asked respondents whether they thought our immigration system should prioritize people with family ties or people based on education and skills. Overall, a plurality (47 percent) said priority should be given to immigrants based on education and skills, verses 39 percent who would prioritize family ties. Democrats (51 percent) favored family ties, while Republicans (62 percent) and independents (48 percent) favored education and skills.[7]

The same survey asked respondents whether the U.S. should prioritize people coming from countries that are struggling or from countries that are economically and politically stable. The majority of respondents (67 percent), said people should be treated the same, regardless of the situation of their home country. Answers were similar regardless of party affiliation.[8]

Quinnipiac University poll released January 24 showed a general consensus in rejecting class, race and religion as determinants of future immigration. Overall, 86 percent of respondents said that class should not matter in determining who should immigrate to the U.S., compared to 10 percent who said they would prefer wealthy or middle-class immigrants. Ninety-seven percent said that race should not matter, compared to 1 percent who thought white immigrants should be given preference. Regarding religion, 10 percent thought Christian immigrants should be given preference, compared to 86 percent who said religion should not matter.[9]

Harvard-Harris poll in January found much less support for family immigration. When asked if the immigration priority for new immigrants should be based on a person’s ability to contribute to America, 79 percent chose that option, verses 21 percent who said immigration should be based on “a person having relatives in the U.S.” While these ideas are not mutually exclusive, the poll question did not explore that option.[10]

Contrasting the Harvard-Harris findings, a very differently-worded question in a Quinnipiac University surveyfrom early February tried to gauge support for family immigration. Respondents were asked if they thought family-based immigration should be limited to only minor children and spouses or if all immediate family members should be eligible for immigration. A plurality of the public (49 percent) said that all immediate family members should be eligible. There was a partisan split on this question, however, with the answers of Republicans and Democrats flipped — 65 percent of Republicans said immigration should be limited to minor children and spouses, and 68 percent of Democrats said all immediate family members should be eligible.[11]

Both the Harvard-Harris January poll and the Quinnipiac early February polls had questions about the diversity visa lottery program that makes available 50,000 immigrant visas to people from countries with historically low immigration to the United States. The questions were asked very differently resulting in very different responses. The Harvard-Harris poll asked respondents whether they favored or opposed “the lottery that randomly picks 50,000 people.”[12] Asked this way, just 32 percent of the public said they favored the program. The Quinnipiac University poll asked respondents whether the diversity visa lottery, which “allows people from countries with low immigration rates to immigrate” to the U.S., should be continued or ended. By 48 percent to 39 percent, the overall public thought the program should continue.[13]

3. Views of Undocumented Immigrants

The public continues to tell survey takers that they prefer legislation that would allow some undocumented immigrants to gain legal status under certain conditions. In the meantime, the public is split about how the Trump Administration is treating undocumented immigrants, with a slight plurality believing that the administration is being too aggressive in its crackdown on undocumented immigrants.

The mid-January CBS News/YouGov poll asked respondents their views about “illegal immigrants.” Respondents had mixed views. A majority (67 percent) agreed that “illegal immigrants fill jobs Americans won’t do,” (with a significant split between supporters and opponents of the president) and 77 percent agreed that these immigrants are “generally hard-working people,” with agreement across the board on that point. It was about even on whether undocumented immigrants drive down wages and whether “illegal immigrants should be deported.” The overall view reflected the sharp disagreement between Trump supporters and opponents. On the question about deportation, a majority of independents (55 percent) shared similar views as Republicans (82 percent) in favoring deportation while most Democrats (79 percent) did not support deportation. However, in this survey, there was no option presented for allowing undocumented immigrants to stay (and most independents in other surveys favor legal status for undocumented immigrants).[14]

CNN poll released on January 19 asked respondents whether the government’s top priority towards immigrants living in the U.S. illegally should be to deport them all, or to develop a plan to allow some to become legal residents.  When presented with options, few respondents (14 percent) chose deportation. Two-thirds (66 percent) of respondents who said they approved of President Trump’s performance favored having the government develop a plan to provide legal residency for some undocumented immigrants. Approval was higher in every other age, gender, income, race, educational and partisan grouping.[15]

Washington Post/ABC News poll released on January 24 asked respondents if they thought the federal government’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants was a good thing or a bad thing for the country. Respondents were split, with 47 percent saying it was bad, verses 46 percent who said it was good. There was a sharp partisan divide, with Democrats (70 percent) and independents (49 percent) saying it was bad, while 81 percent of Republicans said it was good. There was also a significant gender divide, with 51 percent of men saying it was good verses 42 percent of women. Younger people (aged 18 to 39) thought it was bad (52 percent), while results were reversed for those over 65 (52 percent of whom thought it was good).[16]

The Monmouth University poll released in early February asked respondents what they think should happen to “illegal immigrants” who have lived and worked in the U.S. for at least two years. Even though this poll did not specify a list of conditions, such as passing a background check, etc., as many polls do, 77 percent of respondents said they thought these immigrants should be given a chance to keep their jobs and apply for legal status. Support crossed party lines, and included 63 percent of Republicans, 76 percent of independents, and 90 percent of Democrats. There was even 72 percent support for this idea in counties that President Trump won by 10 or more points in the last election.[17]

Quinnipiac University poll released in early February asked questions about the treatment of undocumented immigrants. Respondents were asked whether they thought the Trump administration was acting too aggressively in deporting undocumented immigrants. A plurality, 44 percent, thought that the administration was being too aggressive. There was majority support for this sentiment among Democrats (75 percent), women (53 percent, with white women at 50 percent), people aged 18-34 years (59 percent), and African Americans (66 percent). Hispanics in this survey reflected the public in general, with 44 percent believing the administration was being too aggressive (7 percent not aggressive enough, and 37 percent acting appropriately). Few thought the administration was not being aggressive enough, with this idea being supported most by white men (19 percent), Republicans (18 percent) and whites without college education (17 percent).[18]

This Quinnipiac survey also asked whether respondents thought undocumented immigrants are prone to crime. Respondents rejected that idea by more than a 4 to 1 margin (17 to 72 percent). Only one-third of Republicans (34 percent) believe undocumented immigrants commit more crimes than U.S. citizens. All other partisan and demographic groups were even less receptive to that idea.[19]

Another Quinnipiac University poll in early April showed that a majority of voters do not believe that undocumented immigrants take jobs away from Americans, but there was a significant partisan split, with 65 percent of Republicans believing that undocumented immigrants take jobs away from Americans, but only 15 percent of Democrats having that view. Independents were in between with 35 percent believing these immigrants were taking jobs from Americans. Except for the partisan split on this question, there was only one group that believed this idea was true — whites without a college education (51 percent in agreement). Only about a quarter of voters who identified as black (28 percent) said they thought undocumented immigrants were taking jobs away from Americans.[20]

Voters’ opinions on this issue of whether immigrants are more prone to crime was virtually the same as it was in the February Quinnipiac poll — nearly three-quarters of voters (71 percent) reject the idea that undocumented immigrants are more prone to commit crime than American citizens. A plurality of Republicans (49 percent) reject the idea, while strong majorities of Democrats (92 percent) and independents (74 percent) do not agree.[21]

 

4. Young Immigrants Brought to the U.S. as Children

With so much interest in immigration during this time period, there was constant monitoring of public opinion by the mainstream media and polling organizations. Usually, questions referred to “immigrants brought to the U.S. as children,” treating Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and Dreamers interchangeably.

  • Consensus support for Dreamers: Throughout the period, there was significant public consensus for allowing these immigrants to remain in the U.S. There were more than a dozen polls asking questions about this group of immigrants. While responses sometimes varied between polls, depending on how the question was asked, overall support remained consistent throughout this period. Sympathy for the Dreamers crossed party and ideological lines, as well as race and ethnicity. Weak support can be found only in self-identified “conservatives,” and in President Trump’s strongest supporters. Even with these groups, not every poll showed weak support, such as if a legislative deal for the Dreamers included funding for a border wall.

  • Including border wall funding caused support to fall off: When funding for the border wall was included as part of a package to support the Dreamers, responses became more partisan. Republican support grew, while Democrats’ opposition grew. However, when opponents of a border wall were asked which was more important — opposition to the border wall or protection for Dreamers — they responded protection for the Dreamers was more important.
  • Assigning blame: Voters are more inclined to blame the president and Republicans in Congress if no permanent solution for the Dreamers is passed. Voters are skeptical that the president wants the Dreamers protected from deportation. In one survey, 72 percent of voters said that immigration would be an important factor in their vote in the upcoming Congressional elections, and a greater percentage of Democrats than Republicans said immigration would be “very important” in deciding their vote.

The specific results of the polls are discussed below:

Quinnipiac University poll released January 11, 2018, found 86 percent of voters in favor of allowing Dreamers to stay in the U.S. That includes 79 percent who say the Dreamers should be allowed eventually to apply for citizenship and another 7 percent who say they should be allowed to stay permanently but not become citizens. Just 11 percent say Dreamers should be required to leave the U.S. There is strong support for allowing Dreamers to stay across party lines — including nearly all of Democrats (96 percent), 85 percent of independents, and more than three quarters of Republicans (76 percent).[22]

The Pew Research Center released a poll in mid-January 2018 that questioned a national sample of U.S. adults about their views on what should happen to immigrants who came illegally as children and have temporary status that is ending. In this poll, three-quarters (74 percent) said they favored giving these immigrants permanent legal status. This poll found a significant partisan divide, with 92 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents favoring the proposal and only 50 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents favoring. This poll noted that, while Democrats are united in support of the proposal, Republicans are divided. One fault line is age — Republicans under 50 favor the proposal 57 to 34 percent, while those 50 and older are split, 45 to 45 percent. Another split is along ideology, with 58 percent of moderate and liberal Republicans supporting permanent status for the Dreamers while conservative Republicans are split (46 percent in favor to 44 percent opposed).[23]

Another Quinnipiac University poll, released a week after the one mentioned above, asked respondents if they supported or opposed a bill to allow undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the U.S. Even without the usual qualifiers — passing a background check, getting a college education, joining the military — 73 percent of voters said they would support this action, with a plurality of Republicans (49 percent), and strong majorities of independents (67 percent) and Democrats (93 percent) supporting this action.[24]

Another question in this survey linked funding for the border wall with allowing Dreamers to stay. Legislation that would include both loses public support, with overall support dropping to 39 percent. Only Republicans support this idea (54 percent) and Hispanics are split (42 percent support and 42 percent oppose).[25]

A mid-January CBS News/YouGov survey of U.S. adults had a question to gauge public support for DACA. Overall, 70 percent said they supported DACA. There was majority support across party affiliation, across gender, across all age groups and across race and ethnic groups. White Evangelical Christians supported DACA as well. This survey included questions dividing respondents into four groups with differing views of the president. Those who considered themselves “conservative,” were split 50 percent to 50 percent, and only 41 percent of President Trump’s strongest supporters said they support DACA. Among the four groupings the survey created, the group CBS called “the resisters,” who are opposed to the president, were most favorable to DACA, at 86 percent.[26]

The CBS/YouGov poll also asked respondents if they would support allowing DACA recipients to stay in the U.S. if there was a package that included funding for the border wall. As with the Quinnipiac poll mentioned above, support flipped. Overall, just 42 percent of respondents approved of such a package. However, Republicans (62 percent), conservatives (58 percent) and Trump supporters (62 and 63 percent), said they supported allowing DACA recipients to stay in exchange for funding for the wall. Of those who said they did not support the president, just 21 percent supported the package. When support for DACA recipients is combined with the wall, responses correlate to support or opposition to the president and his signature campaign promise.[27]

CNN poll released on January 19, 2018, asked respondents if they thought the government should continue its policy of allowing some immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the U.S. without risk of deportation. (In other words, continue the DACA program.) Overall, support for allowing these immigrants to remain in the U.S. was 84 percent. Support ranged from nearly seven-in-ten (69 percent) among those who approved of President Trump’s job performance and three-quarters (74 percent) of self-identified conservatives, to 96 percent of Democrats. Among age groups there was very little spread — 87 percent of those aged 18-34 supported DACA, verses 82 percent of those aged 45 and older.[28]

The CNN poll took a subset of respondents — those who both favored allowing the Dreamers to stay and opposed the border wall — and asked them which was more important to them personally, allowing these immigrants to stay or opposing construction of the wall. By 82 to 16 percent, this group said giving Dreamers the chance to stay was more important.[29]

The CNN poll was conducted as Democrats were threatening to withhold their votes for a government spending bill unless there was a permanent solution for the Dreamers included in the bill. The percentage of respondents who said they thought it was more important for Congress to approve a budget and avoid a government shutdown (56 percent) was higher than the 34 percent who said it was more important to pass legislation to maintain DACA. Democrats felt otherwise, with 42 percent wanting to avoid a government shutdown and 49 percent favoring a solution for the Dreamers.[30]

CBS News poll released January 20, 2018, found very strong support for allowing undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the U.S., if they meet certain requirements. Support ranged from 92 percent (Democrats) to 79 percent (Republicans). However, among those supporters, fewer than half (46 percent) thought it was worth shutting down the government in exchange for having these immigrants remain in the U.S.[31]

An NBC-Survey Monkey poll released January 23 found that, by a two to one margin (66 to 31 percent),respondents supported DACA. However, 81 percent said that it was “not acceptable” for the president or members of Congress to threaten a government shutdown in order to achieve policy goals.[32]

In a Washington Post-ABC News survey conducted in mid-January, 87 percent of respondents said they supported a program that allows undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children to remain in the country — 70 percent said they “strongly” support such a program. Almost all Democrats (95 percent) said they support the program, and more than three-quarters (76 percent) of Republicans felt likewise. Independents registered 88 percent approval. Even self-identified conservatives were strongly in favor at 79 percent.[33]

The Post-ABC News poll, conducted just prior to the brief government shutdown in the latter half of January, asked respondent who they would blame if the president and Congress could not come to agreement on immigration and border security, resulting in a partial shutdown. Respondents said they would blame the president and Republicans in Congress over Democrats in Congress by 48 to 28 percent. On this question, there is a large gender divide. While men would blame the president and Republicans over Democrats by a slight plurality (39 to 35 percent), women were more than twice as likely to blame the president and Republicans (55 to 22 percent). Almost twice as many independents said they would blame the president and Republicans in Congress (46 to 25 percent). Young people (age 18 to 39) were also much more likely to blame the president and Republicans in Congress (54 to 20 percent).[34]

Quinnipiac University poll released just after the January government shutdown came to a different conclusion. First the poll reiterated the findings of previous polls —  that there is very strong public support for the Dreamers. In all, 75 percent of respondents said they would support a bill which would allow undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to stay in the U.S.[35]

Among those who supported such a bill, however, fewer than half (43 percent) believed that it was worth shutting down the government to make sure the bill passed.[36]

Voters said they split most of the blame for the government shutdown between the president (31 percent) and Democrats in Congress (32 percent), with an additional 18 percent saying Republicans in Congress were to blame.[37]

In the Quinnipiac survey, no one gets good marks for the way they are handling the issue of undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. Just 42 percent of the public approve of the way Democrats are handling the issue, but that compares to only 24 percent who think Republicans are doing a good job, and 30 percent who think the president is handling the issue well. The overall number masks a wide partisan divide. For example, while 71 percent of Republicans approve of the way President Trump is handling the issue, just 3 percent of Democrats approve of the president’s handling.[38]

A January Harvard-Harris poll asked about the Dreamers in a different way. Respondents were asked whether they thought children brought to the U.S. illegally, “many of whom are now in their 20s and 30s,” should be given work permits. Overall, 78 percent said yes. Support crossed all partisan and demographic characteristics, with the lowest levels of support (64 percent) coming from self-identified conservatives and Trump voters.[39]

This poll again showed little support for a government shutdown over this issue. Overall, 58 percent of respondents said they opposed Democrats voting to shut the government down if the government spending bill failed to include a solution for DACA recipients.[40]

This poll included a question about whether immigrants brought to the U.S. as children without authorization should be given a path to U.S. citizenship, or should not be given a path to citizenship without first returning home. By more than three to one (77 to 23 percent) respondents favored the path to citizenship option without requiring Dreamers return home. The returning home option registered its greatest support (only 36 percent) from self-identified conservatives and Trump voters.[41]

Monmouth University poll, released on February 4, 2018, asked respondents whether they supported requiring immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children leave the U.S. and re-apply for entry. Only 29 percent supported this proposal, while 67 percent opposed it. (Unfortunately, the wording of this question leaves ambiguity about whether the opposition is to having them leave the U.S. or to giving them legal status.) Another question asked respondents if they would support having these immigrants automatically become U.S. citizens, provided they did not have a criminal record. This proposal was strongly supported (by 73 percent of respondents) and there was majority support across party lines and ideology (61 percent support from Republicans, 72 percent from independents and 87 percent from Democrats). Self-identified conservatives supported the idea by 60 percent to 37 who opposed.[42]

Respondents to this poll said that it was “very important” (66 percent) or “somewhat important” (26 percent) for Congress to reach an agreement on the status of Dreamers. More than four out of five (82 percent) believe the issue should be dealt with separately, verses 14 percent who said a solution for the Dreamers should be tied to funding for a border wall. However, a majority of respondents (59 percent) thought it was not acceptable for Democrats to refuse to agree to a budget deal unless the status of Dreamers was settled.[43]

Another Quinnipiac University poll released on February 8, 2018, again found overwhelming support for allowing undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to stay in the U.S., with 81 percent of the voters surveyed favoring the proposal. More than two-thirds (68 percent) of Republicans favored the proposal, with only 24 percent opposed. However, support dropped when a government shutdown was brought in to the mix. Only 30 percent of respondents thought it was worth shutting down the government over the issue of immigration.[44]

Quinnipiac released another survey in mid-February with findings consistent with earlier polls, showing 80 percent support for allowing Dreamers to remain in the U.S., and with strong support across partisan and demographic groups. This poll was released two weeks before President Trump’s March 5 deadline for DACA, and questions in this survey sought to find out who the public would hold responsible if Congress failed to act to prevent the deportation of DACA recipients. Overall, 58 percent said they would hold Republicans responsible. Only Republicans said they would hold the Democrats responsible (57 percent). All other groups broken out in this survey said they would hold Republicans responsible more than Democrats, including independents (57 to 26 percent), women (64 to 20 percent), 18-34 year old voters, (71 percent), Hispanics (66 percent), and African Americans (82 percent). A majority of all groups (except Republicans and white men), and 61 percent of total respondents, also said they would hold President Trump responsible.[45]

While the president had said that he wanted a solution for the Dreamers, the public was skeptical. Overall, 63 percent of respondents to the Quinnipiac poll said they thought the president wanted the Dreamers deported. This includes 63 percent of political independents, 68 percent of women, 72 percent of Hispanics, and 89 percent of African Americans. Voters aged 18-34 were also extremely skeptical (86 percent said they thought the president wanted Dreamers deported). Similarly, respondents said they thought Republicans in Congress wanted Dreamers deported (55 percent).[46]

CNN released a poll on February 28 that again showed the popularity of having immigrants brought to the U.S. as children without authorization remain in the U.S. It described DACA, and asked respondents if they thought the U.S. should continue the program and allow immigrants meeting the qualifications to remain in the U.S. or end the program and allow these immigrants to be deported. Eighty-three percent of respondents favored continuation of the program, verses just 12 percent who thought DACA should be ended. There was across the board support for continuing the program, including 67 percent of Republicans, 83 percent of independents, 94 percent of Democrats, and 64 percent of respondents who said they approve of the president’s performance. Support came from 85 percent of women, 80 percent of men, 79 percent of whites without a college degree and 69 percent of self-identified conservatives. Gun-owning households (76 percent) and white evangelical Christians (73 percent) also favored continuation of the program.[47]

Those who wanted the program to continue were asked who they thought was most responsible for lack of progress in protecting the Dreamers. Most respondents would blame the president (33 percent) or Republicans in Congress (31 percent) and just 17 percent would blame Democrats in Congress.[48]

In a separate poll on February 26, CNN asked respondents how important the issue of immigration would be in their vote for Congress later this year. Seventy-two percent of respondents said it would be “extremely” important (38 percent) or “very important” (35 percent). Among respondents who said they did not approve of the president’s performance, 43 percent said immigration would be “extremely important” in their vote, compared to 33 percent of those who approve of the president’s performance. Among Democrats, 48 percent said immigration would be “extremely important” verses 32 percent of Republicans.[49]

New American Economy and TargetPoint Consulting conducted a poll of Republicans, conservative voters, and President Trump’s “base” voters to gauge their support for Dreamers. What they found is that 79 percent of conservatives and Republicans support providing Dreamers with a path to citizenship if they meet certain conditions (including 45 percent who “strongly” support). Among President Trump’s voters, support is the essentially the same (77 percent, including 43 percent who “strongly” support). When asked about a deal that would include funding and beginning construction of a border wall, billions of dollars in border security funding, and a path to citizenship for Dreamers, support in these constituencies goes up somewhat — 80 percent of conservatives and Republicans say they support this combination (44 percent “strongly”), and 86 percent of President Trump’s voters (51 percent “strongly”).[50]

This poll asked half of the respondents if they would still support President Trump as the Republican presidential nominee in the next election if he got behind a plan combining border security and a path to citizenship for Dreamers. Only 3 percent of President Trump’s voters, and 12 percent of Republicans and conservatives, said they would support another candidate.[51]

In early April, Quinnipiac University conducted another poll that included several questions about undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. First, as with all of the previous polls, there was overwhelming support for allowing these immigrants to stay in the U.S. and eventually apply for citizenship. (And again, strong support crossed party affiliation and gender, race, and age groups.) Asked whether they approved or disapproved of the way President Trump was handling the Dreamer issue, a majority of voters said they disapproved, though there was a significant partisan split. While 59 percent of Republicans support allowing Dreamers to stay and become citizens, 71 percent said they approve of the way the president is handling the issue. Only 5 percent of Democratic voters said they approved, and just 32 percent of independents gave their approval for the president’s performance on this issue.[52]

In the Quinnipiac poll, the president and both parties in Congress got bad reviews when voters were asked whether the president, Republicans in Congress, and Democrats in Congress really cared about the Dreamers or were using the Dreamer issue for political gain. Only 25 percent of voters thought the president and Republicans in Congress cared about the Dreamers, and only 24 percent thought the Democrats did.[53]

*Thank you to Maurice Belanger for all his assistance.

________________________________________________________

[1] Quinnipiac University, “Helping Dreamers Can’t Get U.S. Voters Over The Wall, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Support For Infrastructure Almost 10-1,” released January 18, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2514. Conducted January 12-16, 2018. Sample: 1,212 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Overall, do you believe that legal immigration is good for the country or bad for the country?”
[2] Quinnipiac University, “Helping Dreamers Can’t Get U.S. Voters Over The Wall, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Support For Infrastructure Almost 10-1,” released January 18, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2514. Conducted January 12-16, 2018. Sample: 1,212 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Which comes closer to your point of view: immigration from diverse countries makes the United States better, or immigration from diverse countries makes the United States worse?”
[3] Quinnipiac University, “Helping Dreamers Can’t Get U.S. Voters Over The Wall, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Support For Infrastructure Almost 10-1,” released January 18, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2514. Conducted January 12-16, 2018. Sample: 1,212 voters nationwide. Question wording: “In general, do you think that immigrants from certain countries deserve to immigrate to the United States more than immigrants from other countries, or do you think the country an immigrant is from shouldn’t matter?”
[4] NBC News-Survey Monkey, “Government Shutdown Poll Results,” released January 23, 2018 http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/MSNBC/Sections/NEWS/NBCNews_SurveyMonkey_Govt_Shutdown_Poll_Toplines_Methodology.pdf. Conducted January 20-22, 2018. Sample: 3,450 adults nationwide. Question wording: “Would you say immigration helps the United States more than it hurts it, or immigration hurts the United States more than it helps it?”
[5] Washington Post-ABC News, “Americans give economy best ratings in 17 years, but give Trump low marks,” released January 29, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/page/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2018/01/21/National-Politics/Polling/release_507.xml. Conducted January 15-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 adults nationwide. Question wording: “Overall, do you think immigrants from other countries mainly strengthen or mainly weaken American society? Do you feel that way strongly or somewhat?”
[6] Quinnipiac University, “Trump Trying To Derail Russia Probe, U.S. Voters Tell Quinnipiac University National Poll; Don’t Shut Government Over Immigration, Voters Say 2-1,” released February 6, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2517. Conducted February 2-5, 2018. Sample: 1,333 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Do you think that legal immigration to the United States should be increased, decreased, or kept about the same as it is now?”
[7] CBS News, “Most Americans support DACA, but oppose border wall,” released January 20, 2018 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/most-americans-support-daca-but-oppose-border-wall-cbs-news-poll/. Conducted January 13-16, 2018. Sample: 1,225 adults nationwide. Question wording: “When the U.S. government is deciding which immigrants to admit to this country, should priority be given to (people who have family members already living in the U.S.), or should priority be given to (people based on education, job skills and work experience)?”
[8] CBS News, “Most Americans support DACA, but oppose border wall,” released January 20, 2018 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/most-americans-support-daca-but-oppose-border-wall-cbs-news-poll/. Conducted January 13-16, 2018. Sample: 1,225 adults nationwide. Question wording: “When the U.S. government is deciding which immigrants to admit to this country, should priority be given to (people from countries that are struggling with political and economic instability), or should priority be given to (people from countries that are politically and economically stable) or should they be treated the same?”
[9] Quinnipiac University, “Dems, Trump Share Blame For ‘Unnecessary’ Shutdown, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Are Dissatisfied, Angry With Government,” released January 24, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2515. Conducted January 19-23, 2018. Sample: 1,245 voters nationwide. Questions: 1) “In general, would you like to see wealthy or middle-class immigrants immigrate to the United States more than working class or poor immigrants, or do you think that the economic status of an immigrant shouldn’t matter?” 2) “In general, would you like to see white immigrants immigrate to the United States more than immigrants of other races, or do you think that the race of an immigrant shouldn’t matter?” 3) “In general, would you like to see Christian immigrants immigrate to the United States more than immigrants of other religions, or do you think that the religion of an immigrant shouldn’t matter?”
[10] Monthly Harvard-Harris Poll: “January 2018 Re-Field” http://harvardharrispoll.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Final_HHP_Jan2018-Refield_RegisteredVoters_XTab.pdf. Conducted January 17-19, 2018. Sample: 980 registered voters. Question wording: “Do you think immigration priority for those coming to the U.S. should be based on a person’s ability to contribute to America as measured by their education and skills or based on a person having relatives in the U.S.?”
[11] Quinnipiac University, “Trump Trying To Derail Russia Probe, U.S. Voters Tell Quinnipiac University National Poll; Don’t Shut Government Over Immigration, Voters Say 2-1,” released February 6, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2517. Conducted February 2-5, 2018. Sample: 1,333 voters nationwide. Question wording: “As you may know, there is a program sometimes called family reunification or chain migration. This program allows U.S. citizens to apply to bring their family members to the United States as permanent legal residents. Do you think this program should be limited to only minor children and spouses or do you think that all immediate family members should be eligible?”
[12] Monthly Harvard-Harris Poll: “January 2018 Re-Field” http://harvardharrispoll.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Final_HHP_Jan2018-Refield_RegisteredVoters_XTab.pdf. Conducted January 17-19, 2018. Sample: 980 registered voters. Question wording: “Do you favor or oppose the lottery that randomly picks 50,000 people to enter the U.S. each year for greater diversity?”
[13] Quinnipiac University, “Trump Trying To Derail Russia Probe, U.S. Voters Tell Quinnipiac University National Poll; Don’t Shut Government Over Immigration, Voters Say 2-1,” released February 6, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2517. Conducted February 2-5, 2018. Sample: 1,333 voters nationwide. Question wording: “As you may know, there is a program called the diversity visa lottery. This program allows people from countries with low immigration rates to immigrate to the United States. Do you think this program should continue or do you think it should be ended?”
[14] CBS News/YouGov, “Nation Tracker: Americans weigh in on Trump immigration remarks, first year in office,” released January 14, 2018 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nation-tracker-americans-weigh-in-on-trump-immigration-remarks-first-year-in-office/. Conducted January 10-12 and 12-13, 2018. Sample: 2,164 adults nationwide. Question wording (multipart question): “Do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements about illegal immigrants? A) Illegal Immigrants fill jobs Americans won’t do. B) Illegal immigrants should be deported. C) Illegal immigrants drive down Americans’ wages. D) Illegal immigrants are generally hard-working people.”
[15] CNN, “CNN January 2018,” released January 18, 2018. http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/01/19/rel1a-trump2c.shutdown2c.immigration.pdf. Conducted January 14-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 respondents. Question wording: “In dealing with immigrants ALREADY LIVING IN THE U.S. illegally, should the government’s top priority be deporting all people living in the U.S. illegally, or developing a plan to allow some people living in the U.S. illegally to become legal residents?”
[16] Washington Post-ABC News, “Americans give economy best ratings in 17 years, but give Trump low marks,” released January 29, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/page/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2018/01/21/National-Politics/Polling/release_507.xml. Conducted January 15-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 adults nationwide. Question wording: “Do you think the federal crackdown on undocumented immigrants is a good thing for the country or a bad thing for the country?”
[17] Monmouth University, “Public Says Let Dreamers Stay,” released February 5, 2108 https://www.monmouth.edu/polling-institute/documents/monmouthpoll_us_020518.pdf/. Conducted January 28-30, 2018. Sample: 806 U.S. adults. Question: “If you had to choose, what do you think should happen to most illegal immigrants who have lived and worked in the U.S. for at least two years: They should be given a chance to keep their jobs and eventually apply for legal status, or they should be deported back to their native country.”
[18] Quinnipiac University, “Trump Trying To Derail Russia Probe, U.S. Voters Tell Quinnipiac University National Poll; Don’t Shut Government Over Immigration, Voters Say 2-1,” released February 6, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2517. Conducted February 2-5, 2018. Sample: 1,333 voters nationwide. Question wording: “In your opinion, has the Trump administration been too aggressive in deporting immigrants who are here illegally, not aggressive enough, or has the Trump administration been acting appropriately when it comes to deporting immigrants who are here illegally?”
[19] Quinnipiac University, “Trump Trying To Derail Russia Probe, U.S. Voters Tell Quinnipiac University National Poll; Don’t Shut Government Over Immigration, Voters Say 2-1,” released February 6, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2517. Conducted February 2-5, 2018. Sample: 1,333 voters nationwide. Question wording: “In general, do you think undocumented immigrants commit more crimes than American citizens do, or don’t you think so?”
[20] Quinnipiac University, “Trade War With China Is Bad, U.S. Voters Say 3-1, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Support National Guard, But Not The Wall,” released April 11, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?ReleaseID=2535&What=&strArea=6;0;&strTime=0. Conducted April 6 – 9, 2018. Sample: 1,181 voters nationwide. Question wording: “In general, do you think undocumented immigrants take jobs away from American citizens, or don’t you think so?”
[21] Quinnipiac University, “Trade War With China Is Bad, U.S. Voters Say 3-1, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Support National Guard, But Not The Wall,” released April 11, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?ReleaseID=2535&What=&strArea=6;0;&strTime=0. Conducted April 6 – 9, 2018. Sample: 1,181 voters nationwide. Question wording: “In general, do you think undocumented immigrants are more likely to commit crimes than American citizens, or don’t you think so?”
[22] Quinnipiac University, “Dreamers Should Stay, American Voters Say 8-1, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Do Not Enforce Federal Pot Laws, U.S. Voters Say 3-1,” released January 11, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2512. Conducted January 5-9, 2018.  Sample: 1,106 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Which comes closest to your view about undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children? A) They should be allowed to stay in the United States and to eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. B) They should be allowed to remain in the United States, but not be allowed to apply for U.S. citizenship. C) They should be required to leave the U.S.”
[23] Pew Research Center, “Public backs legal status for immigrants brought to U.S. illegally as children, but not a bigger border wall,” released January 19, 2018 http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/01/19/public-backs-legal-status-for-immigrants-brought-to-u-s-illegally-as-children-but-not-a-bigger-border-wall/. Topline: http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2018/01/19123944/1-19-2018-immigration-topline-for-release.pdf. Conducted January 10-15, 2018. Sample: 1,503 adults, nationwide. Question wording: “As you may know, many immigrants who came illegally to the U.S. when they were children now have temporary legal status that is ending. Would you favor or oppose Congress passing a law granting them permanent legal status?”
[24] Quinnipiac University, “Helping Dreamers Can’t Get U.S. Voters Over The Wall, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Support For Infrastructure Almost 10-1,” released January 18, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2514. Conducted January 12-16, 2018. Sample: 1,212 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Would you support or oppose a bill which allowed undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States legally?”
[25] Quinnipiac University, “Helping Dreamers Can’t Get U.S. Voters Over The Wall, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Support For Infrastructure Almost 10-1,” released January 18, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2514. Conducted January 12-16, 2018. Sample: 1,212 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Would you support or oppose a bill which funded a wall along the border with Mexico, but also allowed undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States legally?”
[26] CBS News/YouGov, “Nation Tracker: Americans weigh in on Trump immigration remarks, first year in office,” released January 14, 2018 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nation-tracker-americans-weigh-in-on-trump-immigration-remarks-first-year-in-office/. Conducted January 10-12 and 12-13, 2018. Sample: 2,164 adults nationwide. Question wording: “Do you favor or oppose DACA — or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — allowing young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the country, if they meet certain requirements such as going to school, joining the military, and don’t have a criminal record?”
[27] CBS News/YouGov, “Nation Tracker: Americans weigh in on Trump immigration remarks, first year in office,” released January 14, 2018 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nation-tracker-americans-weigh-in-on-trump-immigration-remarks-first-year-in-office/. Conducted January 10-12 and 12-13, 2018. Sample: 2,164 adults nationwide. Question wording: “Would you approve or disapprove of a deal that funded the building of the border wall, in exchange for allowing DACA immigrants to stay in the U.S. permanently?”
[28] CNN, “CNN January 2018,” released January 18, 2018. http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/01/19/rel1a-trump2c.shutdown2c.immigration.pdf. Conducted January 14-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 respondents. Question wording: “As you may know, a U.S. government program allows some immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the U.S. without risk of deportation. To qualify, immigrants had to be under the age of 30 as of 2012, have no criminal record, and be a student, in the military or have earned a high school diploma. Do you think the U.S. should continue this policy and allow immigrants who meet these qualifications to remain in the U.S…. or end this policy and allow immigrants to be deported even if they do meet these qualifications?”
[29] CNN, “CNN January 2018,” released January 18, 2018. http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/01/19/rel1a-trump2c.shutdown2c.immigration.pdf. Conducted January 14-18, 2018. Sample: subset of 1,005 respondents who supported dreamers and opposed the border wall. Question wording: “Which is more important to you personally — continuing the program which allows some immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the U.S. without risk of deportation or opposing the construction of a wall along the entire border with Mexico?”
[30] CNN, “CNN January 2018,” released January 18, 2018. http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/01/19/rel1a-trump2c.shutdown2c.immigration.pdf. Conducted January 14-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 respondents. Question wording: “Which do you think is more important for Congress to do — approving a budget agreement that would avoid a government shutdown, or passing legislation to maintain the program which allows immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the U.S.?”
[31] CBS News, “Most Americans support DACA, but oppose border wall,” released January 20, 2018 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/most-americans-support-daca-but-oppose-border-wall-cbs-news-poll/. Conducted January 13-16, 2018. Sample: 1,225 adults nationwide. Wording of questions: “In general, do you favor or oppose allowing young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the country if they meet certain requirements such as going to school or joining the military, and not having a criminal record?” Of those who favor: “Do you think it is worth risking a shutdown of the federal government to allow these young immigrants to stay in the U.S., or not?”
[32] NBC News-Survey Monkey, “Government Shutdown Poll Results,” released January 23 http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/MSNBC/Sections/NEWS/NBCNews_SurveyMonkey_Govt_Shutdown_Poll_Toplines_Methodology.pdf. Conducted January 20-22, 2018. Sample: 3,450 adults nationwide. Questions: 1) “Do you support or oppose the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) policy, which protects those who were brought into the United States as undocumented children from being deported?” 2) “Do you think it is acceptable for the President or members of Congress to threaten a government shutdown to achieve their policy goals, or is that not an acceptable way to negotiate?”
[33] Washington Post-ABC News, “Americans give economy best ratings in 17 years, but give Trump low marks,” released January 29, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/page/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2018/01/21/National-Politics/Polling/release_507.xml. Conducted January 15-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 adults nationwide. Question wording: “Do you support or oppose a program that allows undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States if they arrived here as a child, completed high school or military service and have not been convicted of a serious crime?”
[34] Washington Post-ABC News, “More blame Republicans than Democrats for potential government shutdown,” released January 24, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/page/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2018/01/19/National-Politics/Polling/release_506.xml. Conducted January 15-18, 2018. Sample: 1,005 adults nationwide. Question wording: “As you may know, the federal government might have to partially shut down later this week if (Trump and Republicans in Congress) and (Democrats in Congress) cannot agree on laws about immigration and border security. Who do you think is mainly responsible for this situation – (Trump and Republicans in Congress) or (the Democrats in Congress)?”
[35] Quinnipiac University, “Dems, Trump Share Blame For ‘Unnecessary’ Shutdown, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Are Dissatisfied, Angry With Government,” released January 24, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2515. Conducted January 19-23, 2018. Sample: 1,245 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Would you support or oppose a bill which allowed undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States legally?”
[36] Quinnipiac University, “Dems, Trump Share Blame For ‘Unnecessary’ Shutdown, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Are Dissatisfied, Angry With Government,” released January 24, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2515. Conducted January 19-23, 2018. Sample: 1,245 voters nationwide. Wording of questions: “Do you think it is worth shutting down the government to make sure that bill passes, or not?” Also: “Do you think it is worth shutting down the government to prevent that bill from passing, or not?”
[37] Quinnipiac University, “Dems, Trump Share Blame For ‘Unnecessary’ Shutdown, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Are Dissatisfied, Angry With Government,” released January 24, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2515. Conducted January 19-23, 2018. Sample: 1,245 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Who do you think is responsible for the current/recent government shutdown: Republicans in Congress, Democrats in Congress, or President Trump?”
[38] Quinnipiac University, “Dems, Trump Share Blame For ‘Unnecessary’ Shutdown, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Are Dissatisfied, Angry With Government,” released January 24, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2515. Conducted January 19-23, 2018. Sample: 1,245 voters nationwide. Question wording: “Do you approve or disapprove of the way [Democrats in Congress/Republicans in Congress/President Trump] [are/is] handling the issue of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children?”
[39] Monthly Harvard-Harris Poll: “January 2018 Re-Field” http://harvardharrispoll.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Final_HHP_Jan2018-Refield_RegisteredVoters_XTab.pdf. Conducted January 17-19, 2018. Sample: 980 registered voters. Question wording: “Do you think that children who were brought into this country illegally by their parents, many of whom are now in their 20s and 30s, should be given work permits or denied work permits?”
[40] Monthly Harvard-Harris Poll: “January 2018 Re-Field” http://harvardharrispoll.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Final_HHP_Jan2018-Refield_RegisteredVoters_XTab.pdf. Conducted January 17-19, 2018. Sample: 980 registered voters. Question wording: “Would you favor or oppose Democrats voting to shut the government down if the continuing budget resolution does not include restoring so-called DACA work permits for undocumented immigrants brought here illegally by their parents?”
[41] Monthly Harvard-Harris Poll: “January 2018 Re-Field” http://harvardharrispoll.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Final_HHP_Jan2018-Refield_RegisteredVoters_XTab.pdf. Conducted January 17-19, 2018. Sample: 980 registered voters. Question wording: “Do you think that children who were brought into this country illegally by their parents, many of whom are now in their 20s and 30s, should be given a path to U.S. citizenship or should not be entitled to a path to citizenship without first returning home?”
[42] Monmouth University, “Public Says Let Dreamers Stay,” released February 5, 2108 https://www.monmouth.edu/polling-institute/documents/monmouthpoll_us_020518.pdf/. Conducted January 28-30, 2018. Sample: 806 U.S. adults. Questions: 1) “Some people illegally immigrated to the U.S. with their families when they were children. Would you support or oppose making these immigrants return to their birth country and re-apply for entry to the U.S.?”  2) “And would you support or oppose allowing people who illegally immigrated when they were children to automatically become U.S. citizens as long as they don’t have a criminal record?”
[43] Monmouth University, “Public Says Let Dreamers Stay,” released February 5, 2108 https://www.monmouth.edu/polling-institute/documents/monmouthpoll_us_020518.pdf/. Conducted January 28-30, 2018. Sample: 806 U.S. adults. Questions: 1) “How important is it for Congress to reach an agreement on the status of people who illegally immigrated to the U.S. when they were children (Dreamers). Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important?” 2) “Should a legislative solution on the status of illegal immigrants brought here as children be tied to funding for a border wall or should these two issues be dealt with separately?” 3) “The current federal budget agreement expires on February 8. Even if you don’t agree with their position, do you think it is acceptable or not for Democrats to say they will not agree to a new budget deal until the status of these immigrants is settled?”
[44] Quinnipiac University, “Trump Trying To Derail Russia Probe, U.S. Voters Tell Quinnipiac University National Poll; Don’t Shut Government Over Immigration, Voters Say 2-1,” released February 6, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2517. Conducted February 2-5, 2018. Sample: 1,333 voters nationwide. Questions: 1) “Do you support or oppose allowing undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States and eventually apply for citizenship?” 2) “In general, do you think that the issue of immigration is worth shutting down the government over, or not?”
[45] Quinnipiac University, “U.S. Support For Gun Control Tops 2-1, Highest Ever, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Let Dreamers Stay, 80 Percent Of Voters Say,” released February 20, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2521. Conducted February 16-19, 2018. Sample: 1,249 voters nationwide. Wording of questions: 1) “Do you support or oppose allowing undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States and eventually apply for citizenship?” 2) “As you may know, Congress must pass a bill by March 5th in order to prevent the deportation of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children. If they do not pass a bill to prevent this, who would you say is most responsible: Republicans in Congress, or Democrats in Congress?” 3) “If Congress does not pass a bill in order to prevent the deportation of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, would you also hold President Trump responsible or not?”
[46] Quinnipiac University, “U.S. Support For Gun Control Tops 2-1, Highest Ever, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Let Dreamers Stay, 80 Percent Of Voters Say,” released February 20, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/national/release-detail?ReleaseID=2521. Conducted February 16-19, 2018. Sample: 1,249 voters nationwide. Wording of questions: 1) “Do you think that President Trump wants undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States, or do you think he wants them to be deported?” 2) “Do you think that the Republicans in Congress want undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States, or do you think they want them to be deported?”
[47] CNN February 2018, released February 28, 2018 http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/02/28/rel3d.-.immigration.pdf. Conducted February 20-23, 2018. Sample: 1,016 respondents. Question wording: “As you may know, a U.S. government program allows some immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to remain in the U.S. without risk of deportation. To qualify, immigrants had to be under the age of 30 as of 2012, have no criminal record, and be a student, in the military or have earned a high school diploma. Do you think the U.S. should — Continue this policy and allow immigrants who meet these qualifications to remain in the U.S [or] end this policy and allow immigrants to be deported even if they do meet these qualifications?”
[48] CNN February 2018, released February 28, 2018 http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/02/28/rel3d.-.immigration.pdf. Conducted February 20-23, 2018. Sample: 1,016 respondents. Question wording: “Who do you think is most responsible for that program not having been Republicans in Congress or the Democrats in Congress?”
[49] CNN February 2018, released February 26, 2018 http://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2018/images/02/26/rel3b.-.2018.pdf. Conducted February 20-23, 2018. Sample: 1,016 respondents. Question wording: “How important will [immigration] be to your vote for Congress this year?”
[50] New American Economy and TargetPoint Consulting, “New Polling Shows Huge Support Among Republicans, including Trump’s Base, for Border Security/Dreamer Protection Deal,” released March 12, 2018 http://www.newamericaneconomy.org/press-release/new-polling-shows-huge-support-among-republicans-including-trumps-base-for-border-security-dreamer-protection-deal/. Toplines: http://www.newamericaneconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/National-2018-Immigration-Survey-Comparative-Topline-1.pdf. Conducted February 15 – 18, 2018. Sample: 644 Conservative and Republican voters; 407 Trump base voters. Question wording: 1) “Please tell me if you would support or oppose each of the following proposals…[and whether you would] STRONGLY (support/oppose) or SOMEWHAT (support/oppose)?  Provide a pathway to citizenship for immigrants who were brought here illegally when they were children, sometimes referred to as “Dreamers”, as long as they have no criminal record and either join the military, enroll as a student, or have a high school diploma.” 2) In order to get the votes needed to secure our borders, build the wall, and limit future illegal immigration, some people have proposed a deal that would have three parts… First, provide funding and begin construction of a more robust wall on the southern border. Second, provide billions of dollars in funding for other border security measures. And third, provide a path to citizenship for some immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally when they were children, to remain in the U.S. if they meet certain requirements such as having no criminal record and either joining the military, enrolling as a student, holding a full-time job or having a high school diploma. Thinking about this specific proposal, would you support or oppose this deal?”
[51] New American Economy and TargetPoint Consulting, “New Polling Shows Huge Support Among Republicans, including Trump’s Base, for Border Security/Dreamer Protection Deal,” released March 12, 2018 http://www.newamericaneconomy.org/press-release/new-polling-shows-huge-support-among-republicans-including-trumps-base-for-border-security-dreamer-protection-deal/. Toplines: http://www.newamericaneconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/National-2018-Immigration-Survey-Comparative-Topline-1.pdf. Conducted February 15 – 18, 2018. ½ Sample of: 644 Conservative and Republican voters; 407 Trump base voters. Question wording: “If President Trump decided this was the best plan to secure our borders, do you think you would still support him as the Republican nominee for President in 2020, or would you support a different Republican candidate who refused to support this plan?”
[52] Quinnipiac University, “Trade War With China Is Bad, U.S. Voters Say 3-1, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Support National Guard, But Not The Wall,” released April 11, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?ReleaseID=2535&What=&strArea=6;0;&strTime=0. Conducted April 6 – 9, 2018. Sample: 1,181 voters nationwide. Wording of questions: 1) “Do you support or oppose allowing undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the United States and eventually apply for citizenship?” 2) “Do you approve or disapprove of the way President Trump is handling the issue of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children?”
[53] Quinnipiac University, “Trade War With China Is Bad, U.S. Voters Say 3-1, Quinnipiac University National Poll Finds; Voters Support National Guard, But Not The Wall,” released April 11, 2018 https://poll.qu.edu/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?ReleaseID=2535&What=&strArea=6;0;&strTime=0. Conducted April 6 – 9, 2018. Sample: 1,181 voters nationwide. Wording of questions: 1) “Do you think that President Trump and the Republicans in Congress care about the undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, or do you think they are using this issue for political gain?” 2) Do you think that Democrats in Congress care about the undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, or do you think they are using this issue for political gain?”

 

Related Topics

Legal Immigration The Undocumented

Learn More

Read more about Polling Update: Heated Immigration Debates, Public Opinion Still Supports Immigrants

Polling Update: Heated Immigration Debates, Public Opinion Still Supports Immigrants

Read more about Polling Summary: Presidential Campaign Messaging Out of Step With General Electorate Attitudes on Immigration

Article

Polling Summary: Presidential Campaign Messaging Out of Step With General Electorate Attitudes on Immigration

Read more about Polling Update: Public Attitudes on Immigration and Trump Administration Immigration Initiatives

Article

Polling Update: Public Attitudes on Immigration and Trump Administration Immigration Initiatives