Western Leaders Urge Legislative Solution for Dreamers

Communications Associate

December 4, 2017

Click here for a recording of today’s call.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A Mormon Dreamer from Utah and faith and law enforcement leaders from the West agree: We need a legislative solution for Dreamers before the end of the year.

Following a press call today on which they discussed the urgency of a solution, these leaders and others from the South Central and Western United States will meet with their members of Congress Wednesday in D.C. to push for legislation.

Without action from Congress, Dreamers such as Bernardo Castro of Utah will be in danger of deportation when their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) expires. A new video highlights Castro’s story.

The following are quotes from speakers on today’s call:

Caleb Campbell, Lead Pastor, Desert Springs Bible Church, Phoenix:
“As a pastor of a multiethnic congregation in north Phoenix, I fundamentally believe that our leaders need to act to provide a robust legislative solution for Dreamers this month. Many members of our congregation and community are directly impacted by this issue. Dreamers in my congregation participate as active members, serve as volunteers and lead as employees. Failing to act will adversely impact these loving servants of our community.”

Bernardo Castro, DACA Recipient and Student, Brigham Young University:
“Every day that Congress waits to find a solution is a day of growing uncertainty for me and for hundreds of thousands of others like me. We just want to keep contributing, keep providing for ourselves and our families, here in our home — the United States. I’m coming to Washington this week because we are so ready to give back, to be free of the questions that are weighing us down right now. We need Congress to pass a solution as soon as possible.”

“I’m undocumented and scared. I’m not scared for myself, because I know I’ll be OK, but I’m scared for all those caught in the middle who are children and U.S. citizens and will lose a brother, a sister, a mom or dad. I’m going to Washington to advocate not just for Dreamers, but for everyone affected.”

Capt. Ron Winegar, Boise, Idaho, Police Department:
“I am greatly interested in discussing solutions to the very complex issues related to immigration.  If this problem was easily fixed, it would have been resolved a long time ago. We must engage and work together, considering all perspectives and interests, to come to a resolution that will be good for the individual as well as the community and country as a whole.”

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